Cost of Bone Marrow Transplant

The no. of patients who require a stem cell transplant are increasing day by day. The field of transplantation medicine and medical tourism are reaching great lengths to make the technology reachable to everyone all over the world. The healthcare industry is not just concerned with the health of the patients in their respective countries but of those of other countries. This is due to shrinkage of the world and rising closeness of the nations.

Each country has their own set of rules and regulations which ultimately affects the cost and other expenses of treatment. In India, the cost of treatment varies for patients of different countries because of their exchange rate and other taxes & duties.

The cost of treatments for some of the countries are:

  • NIGERIA: More Nigerians are spending time abroad for medical tourism more than as expected or assumed. The statistics show that 5,000 trips were made to India in the past year.
    Nigeria has a healthcare budget of N221.7 billion to be spent on health sector in 2016. This represents 6.5% of total government expenditure on health. If you are between the ages of 30 to 70, you need to know that there is a 20% probability that you can ever die from these diseases while living in Nigeria; Cancer, Diabetes, Cardiovascular and Chronic respiratory disease.
    Leukaemia has a 94% death rate in Nigeria. Leukaemia occurs in both adults and children and it is one of the four most common cancer in Nigerian children. The Nigerian leukaemia situation is unfortunate because, leukaemia is now curable. For instance, the Tata Cancer Centre in India has a 99% survival rate for leukaemia, in sharp contrast from the current situation in Nigeria.
    For Nigerians, an autologous stem cell transplant would approximately cost 72,00,000.00 Nigerian Niara. Whereas, an allogenic transplant from a full match relative cost around 1,00,80,000 Nigerian Niara. For a haplo transplant (from sibling or half match relative), it costs around 1,26,00,000 Nigerian Niara. An allogenic transplant from a non-relative full match is estimated to be around 1,80,00,000 Nigerian Naira.
    Nigerians surely want a better medical care and several innovations are emerging in the country to fill this gap. Do comment on what you think about these facts about Nigeria’s Health Care system.
  • GHANA: Ghana is a developing country in West Africa with a population of about 25 million. Medical illnesses in Ghana overlap with those in developed countries, but infection, trauma, and women’s health problems are much more prominent. 
    Well-endowed with natural resources (including gold, timber, and cocoa), Ghana has a much higher per capita economic output than most West African countries but remains partially dependent on international financial and technical assistance.
    Chronic myeloid leukaemia, also known as chronic myelogenous leukaemia, (CML) accounts for about 4,400 new cases of leukaemia each year. It affects mainly adults.
    Acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL) accounts for about 3,800 new cases of leukaemia each year. It is the most common type of leukaemia in young children. It also affects adults. Acute myeloid leukaemia, (AML) accounts for about 10,600 new cases of leukaemia each year. It occurs in both adults and children.
    For people from Ghana, an autologous stem cell transplant would approximately cost 95,800 Ghanaian Cedis. Whereas, an allogenic transplant from a full match relative cost around 1,34,120 Ghanaian Cedis. For a haplo transplant (from sibling or half match relative), it costs around 1,67,650 Ghanaian Cedis. An allogenic transplant from a non-relative full match is estimated to be around 2,39,500 Ghanaian Cedis.
  • PAKISTAN: Blood cancer is affecting the people in every age. Childhood leukaemia, Acute Lymphoblast Leukaemia (ALL) and blood cancer are known to be the major sources which are enhancing the mortality rate of children in Pakistan. In Pakistan more than 85,000 people die every year among them approximately 70% out of 100% are suffering from blood cancer.
    In Pakistan, mostly the poor people are the victim of this fatal disease because they are not able to pay the high cost incurring on treatment of blood cancer. Although there is no credible data to measure the incidence or prevalence of leukaemia, or for that matter, many diseases in Pakistan, doctors make such observations on the basis of increasing number of patients visiting their clinics with a specific disease, in this case leukaemia.
    The real management of the disease involves bone marrow transplant; however, there are certain reservations about such an intervention. Firstly, it is a costly treatment and not common in Pakistan. Secondly, it needs a donor whose bone marrow matches with that of the patient. Thirdly, the mortality rate among those who opt for bone marrow transplant is about 30%, and in 40% of the cases, there is a chance of reoccurrence of the disease after treatment.
    For Pakistanis, an autologous stem cell transplant would approximately cost 24,32,000.00 Pakistani Rupee. Whereas, an allogenic transplant from a full match relative cost around 34,04,800.00 Pakistani Rupee. For a haplo transplant (from sibling or half match relative), it costs around 42,56,000.00 Pakistani Rupee. An allogenic transplant from a non-relative full match is estimated to be around 60,80,000.00 Pakistani Rupee.
  • KENYA: Kenya, like most of the African continent still suffers from a poor quality of healthcare services. Although, it is growing in terms of economy and tourism, the state of people’s health is abysmal.
    Kenya’s per capita expenditure on health stands at $169 (Sh17,000) compared to say Netherlands (which was recently in the news as one of the countries with the best healthcare) at $5,202 (Sh520,400).
    Not much research has been done regarding the prevalence of the blood cancer in the country. But, the condition is thought to be same as that in other African country.
    For Kenyians, an autologous stem cell transplant would approximately cost 20,18,090.00 Kenyan Shilling. Whereas, an allogenic transplant from a full match relative cost around 28,25,326.00 Kenyan Shilling. For a haplo transplant (from sibling or half match relative), it costs around 35,31,657.50 Kenyan Shilling. An allogenic transplant from a non-relative full match is estimated to be around 50,45,225.00 Kenyan Shilling.
  • United Arab Emirates: The health care system in UAE is a mixed public-private system. There is a public system for Emiratis with centralised management and financing models and there is a large and growing private sector in the main urban centres.
    Cancer is the third leading cause of death in United Arab Emirates. Leukaemia alone is responsible for more than 9.1% deaths in the region. The incidence of acute leukaemia is between one to four per 100,000 people worldwide, as a general figure. The chronic form is more common, particularly in the elderly population and is in the region of 20 to 25 per 100,000.
    For patients from UAE, an autologous stem cell transplant would approximately cost 73,461.60 United Arab Emirates Dirham. Whereas, an allogenic transplant from a full match relative cost around 1,02,846.24 United Arab Emirates Dirham. For a haplo transplant (from sibling or half match relative), it costs around 1,28,557.80 United Arab Emirates Dirham. An allogenic transplant from a non-relative full match is estimated to be around 1,83,654.00 United Arab Emirates Dirham.
  • RUSSIA: Government in Russia spends about 6.5% of their GDP on healthcare related services. But, Many Russians avoid health care. Doctors are too expensive and clinics are overcrowded and the waits can be unimaginably long. After the breakup of the Soviet Union, entire segments of the health care system collapsed. The idea of paying for health care is extremely unpopular.
    Leukaemia represents the most common type of child cancer in Russia which counts to 33%. The peak incidence of childhood leukaemia (specifically, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia) is most commonly observed in children aged 2 to 6 years old.
    round 14 children in Russia are diagnosed with cancer each day and only a few get the desperately needed treatment. Due to the lack of a medical infrastructure, the disease is among the main causes of toddler deaths.
    For Russian patients who desire to get their treatment done in India, an autologous stem cell transplant would approximately cost 12,56,270.00 Russian Ruble. Whereas, an allogenic transplant from a full match relative cost around 17,58,778.00 Russian Ruble. For a haplo transplant (from sibling or half match relative), it costs around 17,58,778.00 Russian Ruble. An allogenic transplant from a non-relative full match is estimated to be around 31,40,675.00 Russian Ruble.
  • NEPAL: Nepal is a developing Asian country with a very low population as compared to other Asian countries. An estimated 700 leukaemia, 200 lymphoma, and 70 multiple myeloma patients are diagnosed in Nepal's cancer hospitals every year. There is no Stem cell transplant centre in Nepal, a country with a population of 30 million. Unfortunately, the country lacks both trained manpower and a facility to provide stem cell transplant services to these patients.
    For Nepalis, an autologous stem cell transplant would approximately cost 21,68,800.00 Nepalese Rupee. Whereas, an allogenic transplant from a full match relative cost around 30,36,320.00 Nepalese Rupee. For a haplo transplant (from sibling or half match relative), it costs around 37,95,400.00 Nepalese Rupee. An allogenic transplant from a non-relative full match is estimated to be around 54,22,000.00 Nepalese Rupee.
  • BANGLADESH: Health levels remain relatively low in Bangladesh, although they have improved recently as poverty (31% at 2010) levels have decreased. Due to huge number of population, Bangladesh faces double burden of diseases: Non-Communicable diseases: Diabetes, Cardiovascular diseases, Hypertension, Stroke, Chronic respiratory diseases, Cancer and Communicable diseases: Tuberculosis, HIV, Tetanus, Malaria, Measles, Rubella, leprosy and so on. 
    The global burden from cancer is rising, especially as low-income countries like Bangladesh observe rapid aging.
    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy seen in Bangladesh and is potentially curable. However, since parents currently have to pay for the full cost of therapy, high rates of treatment refusal and abandonment are observed, principally as a result of non-affordability. To date, no published data on the exact costs has existed for Bangladesh which makes clear parental counselling at diagnosis impossible. So far, there are no comprehensive descriptions reporting diagnosed cancer group that include haematological malignancies in Bangladesh.
    For Bangladeshis, an autologous stem cell transplant would approximately cost 16,89,797.00 Bangladeshi Taka. Whereas, an allogenic transplant from a full match relative cost around 23,65,715.80 Bangladeshi Taka. For a haplo transplant (from sibling or half match relative), it costs around 23,65,715.80 Bangladeshi Taka. An allogenic transplant from a non-relative full match is estimated to be around 42,24,492.50 Bangladeshi Taka.
  • TANZANIA:  Tanzania is a low-income country in east Africa, and an estimated 46% of Tanzanians live below the poverty line of $1.90 per day. Tanzania has an estimated population of greater than 53 million, and 45% of the population is younger than 15 years of age. There is no national cancer registry, so the population-based cancer incidence in children is unknown, but it is estimated at 134 occurrences per million.
    According to some reports, lymphoma accounts for 5.5% of all cancer cases in the country, whereas other blood cancers comprise of 4.4% cases.
    For patients from Tanzania, an autologous stem cell transplant would approximately cost 4,55,06,000.00 Tanzanian Shilling. Whereas, an allogenic transplant from a full match relative cost around 6,37,08,400.00 Tanzanian Shilling. For a haplo transplant (from sibling or half match relative), it costs around 7,96,35,500.00 Tanzanian Shilling. An allogenic transplant from a non-relative full match is estimated to be around 11,37,65,000.00 Tanzanian Shilling.
  • SOUTH AFRICA: South Africa is one of the most developed nations in the African continent. In South Africa, private and public health systems exist in parallel. The public system serves the vast majority of the population but is chronically underfunded and understaffed. The wealthiest 20% of the population use the private system and are far better served. In 2005, South Africa spent 8.7% of GDP on health care, or US$437 per capita. Of that, approximately 42% was government expenditure.
    But, the disease burden remains huge. Like any other developing country there is a dual burden of disease i.e. both communicable and non-communicable. Also, there is very high incidence of HIV/AIDS along with related disorders. Most common in the sub-Saharan Africa is Kaposi’s Sarcoma. Blood Cancers such as Leukaemia, Lymphomas are very common in both children and adults. 
    For South African residents, an autologous stem cell transplant would approximately cost 2,69,475.80 South African Rand. Whereas, an allogenic transplant from a full match relative cost around 3,77,266.12 South African Rand. For a haplo transplant (from sibling or half match relative), it costs around 4,71,582.65 South African Rand. An allogenic transplant from a non-relative full match is estimated to be around 6,73,725.00 South African Rand.
  • UNITED KINGDOM: Every year in the UK, around 40,000 people are diagnosed with blood cancer. Blood cancer is the most common type of cancer amongst children, teenagers and young people in the UK. It is the fifth most common type of cancer in the UK. In the UK, 1 in 16 men and 1 in 22 women will develop blood cancer at some point in their lives.
    There are around 240,000 people living with blood cancer in the UK.
    Blood cancer is the third biggest cancer killer in the UK, claiming the lives of more than 15,000 people each year - more than breast cancer or prostate cancer.
    The large-scale provision of health services basically began in the newly industrialized England. The 18th century England and Europe can be applauded for most of the modern therapies. But, with time India is progressing and treatment costs in UK is increasing.
    For patients from UK, an autologous stem cell transplant would approximately cost 15,078.10 Pound sterling. Whereas, an allogenic transplant from a full match relative cost around 21,109.34 Pound sterling. For a haplo transplant (from sibling or half match relative), it costs around 26,386.68 Pound sterling. An allogenic transplant from a non-relative full match is estimated to be around 37,700.00 Pound sterling.
  • FRANCE: While no country can rightly claim to have the best health care system in the world, the French appear broadly satisfied with theirs. It certainly has several advantages, such as good access to high-quality care and a growing recognition of patients’ rights. Its weak points are its complexity (citizens often find it hard to navigate) and the limited emphasis on preventative care. Counterintuitively, the French system often acts as though a cure is better than not falling ill in the first place.
    France is one of the developed countries of the world with an expensive healthcare. There is an increasing trend among the French to seek treatment for various cancers in India where the cost would be very less but quality is comparable to their respective country.
    In this case, an autologous stem cell transplant would approximately cost 17,158.00 Euro. Whereas, an allogenic transplant from a full match relative cost around 24,023.58 Euro. For a haplo transplant (from sibling or half match relative), it costs around 30,029.48 Euro. An allogenic transplant from a non-relative full match is estimated to be around 42,899.25 Euro.

In case you country is not listed above, please send your details to out team to get an estimate for Bone Marrow Transplant.


Frequently Asked Questions

How many types of cancer are there?
There are more than 100 types of known cancer types.

What are the early symptoms of blood cancer?
The most common symptoms of the blood cancer include: fever or chills,
chronic feeling of fatigue and tiredness, loss of appetite, frequent infections
and night sweats.

Why does the diagnosis seem to delay in most of the cases?
Cancer cells multiply literally billions of times before the symptoms start to
show. That is why some methods of screening and prevention are important.

What is bone marrow?
Bone marrow is the soft centre of the bones where blood cells are formed.
When these immature blood cells start dividing rapidly it causes the
overcrowding of abnormal blood cells as a result of which cancer develops.

What should be done in case of any of these symptoms?
Since the blood cancer symptoms are quite vague, one should see the
doctor if the symptoms are unusual for the person as well as last for a longer
time
.

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